Faculty Appointment, Review, & Advancement

Robert Fujinami, PhD, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, School of Medicine, and Wyatt Rory Hume, DDS, PhD, Dean of the School of Dentistry, and Associate Vice President for Health Sciences Faculty and Academic Affairs work closely with faculty members, administrative staff, and leadership across the Health Sciences campus to facilitate faculty governance, along with the faculty appointment, review, and advancement (FARA) process formerly known as retention, promotion, and tenure (RPT), this process is now called faculty appointment, review, and advancement (FARA).

Latest News

Intensive Blood Pressure Control Could Prevent 100,000 Deaths Each Year
Research
Feb 13, 2017

Intensive Blood Pressure Control Could Prevent 100,000 Deaths Each Year

blood pressure, hypertension

Researchers have projected that aggressively lowering blood pressure could help prevent more than 100,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Experts from the University of Utah and institutions across the country built upon the landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial which found that decreasing blood pressure to 120 mmHg compared to 140 mmHg reduced heart attack, stroke and death in people that were at high risk. Until now, the number of lives that could be saved was unknown.... Read More

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Genomes in Flux: New Study Reveals Hidden Dynamics of Bird and Mammal DNA Evolution
Research
Feb 06, 2017

Genomes in Flux: New Study Reveals Hidden Dynamics of Bird and Mammal DNA Evolution

genome, evolution

Evolution is often thought of as a gradual remodeling of the genome, the genetic blueprints for building an organism. But in some instances it might be more appropriate to call it an overhaul. Over the past 100 million years, the human lineage has lost one-fifth of its DNA, while an even greater amount was added, report scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Until now, the extent to which our genome has expanded and contracted had been underappreciated. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections
Research
Feb 06, 2017

Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections

cdiff, hospital-acquired infection

Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile often shortened to C. diff now the most common hospital acquired infection in the United States. But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole. ... Read More

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