Lisa G. Aspinwall, PhD

Research Interests

  • Genetics
  • Social Cognition
  • Health Behavior
  • Self-Regulation
  • Emotion
  • Risk Communication

Languages

  • English

Academic Information

  • Departments: Psychology - Professor
  • Cancer Center Programs: Cancer Control & Population Sciences

Academic Office Information

  • 801-587-9021
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences
    Psychology
    380 S 1530 E, Room: 502
    Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Academic Bio

Lisa G. Aspinwall, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Utah and a member of the Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program at Huntsman Cancer Institute.Her research involves genetic risk notification and its effect on cancer prevention. She also studies positive and negative emotions, their effect on processing negative events, and how positive psychology impacts cancer survivorship and resilience. In 2000, she was awarded a Templeton Positive Psychology Prize by the John Templeton Foundation and the American Psychological Association.Aspinwall received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and both a master's and doctoral degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Utah in 2000, Aspinwall was assistant and associate professor of psychology at the University of Maryland.She has published several articles on cancer survivorship and genetic testing in high-risk families, with a particular focus on melanoma genetic testing.

Education History

Type School Degree
Doctoral Training University of California, Los Angeles
Social Psychology
Ph.D.
Graduate Training University of California, Los Angeles
Social Psychology
M.A.
Undergraduate Stanford University
Psychology
B.A.

Selected Publications

Journal Article

  1. Perceived risk following melanoma genetic testing: a 2-year prospective study distinguishing subjective estimates from recall.Aspinwall LG, Taber JM, Kohlmann W, Leaf SL, Leachman SA (2014). Perceived risk following melanoma genetic testing: a 2-year prospective study distinguishing subjective estimates from recall. J Genet Couns, 23(3), 421-37.
  2. Patient and provider attitudes toward genomic testing for prostate cancer susceptibility: a mixed method study.Birmingham WC, Agarwal N, Kohlmann W, Aspinwall LG, Wang M, Bishoff J, Dechet C, Kinney AY (2013). Patient and provider attitudes toward genomic testing for prostate cancer susceptibility: a mixed method study. BMC Health Serv Res, 13, 279.
  3. Genetic testing for hereditary melanoma and pancreatic cancer: a longitudinal study of psychological outcome.Aspinwall LG, Taber JM, Leaf SL, Kohlmann W, Leachman SA (2013). Genetic testing for hereditary melanoma and pancreatic cancer: a longitudinal study of psychological outcome. Psychooncology, 22(2), 276-89.
  4. Melanoma genetic counseling and test reporting improve screening adherence among unaffected carriers 2 years later.Aspinwall LG, Taber JM, Leaf SL, Kohlmann W, Leachman SA (2013). Melanoma genetic counseling and test reporting improve screening adherence among unaffected carriers 2 years later. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 22(10), 1687-97.
  5. Skin examination behavior: the role of melanoma history, skin type, psychosocial factors, and region of residence in determining clinical and self-conducted skin examination.Kasparian NA, Branstrom R, Chang YM, Affleck P, Aspinwall LG, Tibben A, Azizi E, Baron-Epel O, Battistuzzi L, Bruno W, Chan M, Cuellar F, Debniak T, Pjanova D, Ertmanski S, Figl A, Gonzalez M, Hayward NK, Hocevar M, Kanetsky PA, Leachman S, Bergman W, Heisele O, Palmer J, Peric B, Puig S, Schadendorf D, Gruis NA, Newton-Bishop J, Brandberg Y (2012). Skin examination behavior: the role of melanoma history, skin type, psychosocial factors, and region of residence in determining clinical and self-conducted skin examination. Arch Dermatol, 148(10), 1142-51.
  6. Melanoma risk factors, perceived threat and intentional tanning: an international online survey.Branstrom R, Chang YM, Kasparian N, Affleck P, Tibben A, Aspinwall LG, Azizi E, Baron-Epel O, Battistuzzi L, Bruno W, Chan M, Cuellar F, Debniak T, Pjanova D, Ertmanski S, Figl A, Gonzalez M, Hayward NK, Hocevar M, Kanetsky PA, Leaf SL, van Nieuwpoort FA, Heisele O, Palmer J, Peric B, Puig S, Ruffin AD, Schadendorf D, Gruis NA, Brandberg Y, Newton-Bishop J (2010). Melanoma risk factors, perceived threat and intentional tanning: an international online survey. Eur J Cancer Prev, 19(3), 216-26.
  7. Predictors of sun protection behaviors and severe sunburn in an international online study.Branstrom R, Kasparian NA, Chang YM, Affleck P, Tibben A, Aspinwall LG, Azizi E, Baron-Epel O, Battistuzzi L, Bergman W, Bruno W, Chan M, Cuellar F, Debniak T, Pjanova D, Ertmanski S, Figl A, Gonzalez M, Hayward NK, Hocevar M, Kanetsky PA, Leachman SA, Heisele O, Palmer J, Peric B, Puig S, Schadendorf D, Gruis NA, Newton-Bishop J, Brandberg Y (2010). Predictors of sun protection behaviors and severe sunburn in an international online study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 19(9), 2199-210.
  8. Parental preferences for CDKN2A/p16 testing of minors.Taber JM, Aspinwall LG, Kohlmann W, Dow R, Leachman SA (2010). Parental preferences for CDKN2A/p16 testing of minors. Genet Med, 12(12), 823-38.
  9. Patterns of photoprotection following CDKN2A/p16 genetic test reporting and counseling.Aspinwall LG, Leaf SL, Kohlmann W, Dola ER, Leachman SA (2009). Patterns of photoprotection following CDKN2A/p16 genetic test reporting and counseling. J Am Acad Dermatol, 60(5), 745-57.
  10. CDKN2A/p16 genetic test reporting improves early detection intentions and practices in high-risk melanoma families.Aspinwall LG, Leaf SL, Dola ER, Kohlmann W, Leachman SA (2008). CDKN2A/p16 genetic test reporting improves early detection intentions and practices in high-risk melanoma families. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 17(6), 1510-9.

Letter

  1. Partner involvement in conduct of skin self-examinations remains low following CDKN2A/p16 genetic test reporting and counseling.Taber JM, Aspinwall LG, Leaf SL, Kohlmann W, Leachman SA (2013). Partner involvement in conduct of skin self-examinations remains low following CDKN2A/p16 genetic test reporting and counseling [Letter to the editor]. J Am Acad Dermatol, 69(5), 842-4.