Adam Bress, Pharm.D., M.S.

Languages

  • English

Academic Information

  • Departments: Population Health Sciences - Assistant Professor
  • Divisions: Health System Innovation and Research

Academic Office Information

  • Williams Building
    295 Chipeta Way
    Salt Lake City, UT 84108

Academic Bio

Dr. Bress is currently Assistant Professor of Population Health Sciences in the Division of Health System Innovation and Research and an Investigator at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System.

Dr. Bress received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Maryland, and his Masters of Science in Clinical and Translational Science from the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health with a focus on epidemiology. He completed his residency in pharmacy practice at Yale-New Haven Hospital and Cardiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He subsequently completed his post-doctoral research fellowship in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Bress is a cardiovascular clinical pharmacist and population scientist whose research is focused on the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. He is particularly interested in genetic ancestry and racial/ethnic differences in antihypertensive medication responses and population-level impact and generalizability of intensive blood pressure treatment. His research uses pharmacoepidemiology (drug effects in populations) and pharmacogenetics (genetic causes of variable drug effects) and aims to understand the complex issues surrounding race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and racial/ethnic differences in medication responses and outcomes. He is particularly interested in how genetic ancestry can be used to learn more about the multi-factorial causes of racial/ethnic differences in medication responses and health outcomes. After coming to the Universtiy of Utah, he received an NIH career development award investigating genetic and environmental causes of racial/ethnic differences in blood pressure medication responses and cardiovascular disease events.

Dr. Bress's research has been featured in the New York Times and CBS radio and has produced a recommended article by F1000 prime.

Dr. Bress has received peer-reviewed extramural research support as Principal Investigator (PI) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) specifically from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). He is currently PI of a five-year K01 award which is determining the association between genetic ancestry, including individual genetic variants, with blood pressure control, antihypertensive medication responses, and cardiovascular disease outcomes in African Americans. This project will identify genetic factors that may account for observed racial differences in antihypertensive medication response, potentially identify new approaches for optimizing antihypertensive medication prescribing and thereby improve blood pressure control rates in African Americans. His mentors and scientific advisors for this award are Lynn Jorde (human genetics), Rachel Hess (health services research), Rick Kittles (genetic ancestry and health disparities), Donna Arnett (pharmacogenetics), Paul Muntner (hypertension epidemiology), and Tom Greene (biostatistics).

He also received grant support from the biomedical industry as PI for investigator-initiated research projects focused on cardiovascular pharmacoepidemiology. ‚Äč

Education History

Type School Degree
Research Fellow University of Illinois at Chicago
Cardiovascular Pharmacogenomics
Research Fellow
Graduate Training University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health
Clinical and Translational Science
M.S.
Residency University of Illinois at Chicago
Cardiology
Resident
Residency Yale-New Haven Hospital
Pharmacy Practice
Resident
Doctoral Training University of Maryland
Pharmacy
Pharm.D.

Selected Publications

Journal Article

  1. The effect of pharmacogenetic profiling with a clinical decision support tool on healthcare resource utilization and estimated costs in the elderly exposed to polypharmacy.Brixner D, Biltaji E, Bress A, Unni S, Ye X, Mamiya T, Ashcraft K, Biskupiak J (2016). The effect of pharmacogenetic profiling with a clinical decision support tool on healthcare resource utilization and estimated costs in the elderly exposed to polypharmacy. J Med Econ, 19(3), 213-28.
  2. Generalizability of SPRINT Results to the U.S. Adult Population.Bress AP, Tanner RM, Hess R, Colantonio LD, Shimbo D, Muntner P (2016). Generalizability of SPRINT Results to the U.S. Adult Population. J Am Coll Cardiol, 67(5), 463-72.
  3. Circulating Procollagen Type III N-Terminal Peptide and Mortality Risk in African Americans With Heart Failure.Mansour IN, Bress AP, Groo V, Ismail S, Wu G, Patel SR, Duarte JD, Kittles RA, Stamos TD, Cavallari LH (2016). Circulating Procollagen Type III N-Terminal Peptide and Mortality Risk in African Americans With Heart Failure. J Card Fail, 22(9), 692-9.
  4. Pharmacotherapy Treatment Patterns, Outcomes, and Health Resource Utilization Among Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction at a U.S. Academic Medical Center.Bress AP, King JB, Brixner D, Kielhorn A, Patel HK, Maya J, Lee VC, Biskupiak J, Munger M (2016). Pharmacotherapy Treatment Patterns, Outcomes, and Health Resource Utilization Among Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction at a U.S. Academic Medical Center. Pharmacotherapy, 36(2), 174-86.
  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Sacubitril-Valsartan Combination Therapy Compared With Enalapril for the Treatment of Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction.King JB, Shah RU, Bress AP, Nelson RE, Bellows BK (2016). Cost-Effectiveness of Sacubitril-Valsartan Combination Therapy Compared With Enalapril for the Treatment of Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction. JACC Heart Fail, 4(5), 392-402.
  6. Genetic ancestry as an effect modifier of naltrexone in smoking cessation among African Americans: an analysis of a randomized controlled trial.Bress A, Kittles R, Wing C, Hooker SE Jr, King A (2015). Genetic ancestry as an effect modifier of naltrexone in smoking cessation among African Americans: an analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Pharmacogenet Genomics, 25(6), 305-12.
  7. Revisiting Warfarin Dosing Using Machine Learning Techniques.Sharabiani A, Bress A, Douzali E, Darabi H (2015). Revisiting Warfarin Dosing Using Machine Learning Techniques. Comput Math Methods Med, 2015, 560108.
  8. Poor warfarin dose prediction with pharmacogenetic algorithms that exclude genotypes important for African Americans.Drozda K, Wong S, Patel SR, Bress AP, Nutescu EA, Kittles RA, Cavallari LH (2015). Poor warfarin dose prediction with pharmacogenetic algorithms that exclude genotypes important for African Americans. Pharmacogenet Genomics, 25(2), 73-81.
  9. Evaluation of dabigatran bleeding adverse reaction reports in the FDA adverse event reporting system during the first year of approval.McConeghy KW, Bress A, Qato DM, Wing C, Nutescu EA (2014). Evaluation of dabigatran bleeding adverse reaction reports in the FDA adverse event reporting system during the first year of approval. Pharmacotherapy, 34(6), 561-9.
  10. Use of a simplified nomogram to individualize digoxin dosing versus standard dosing practices in patients with heart failure.DiDomenico RJ, Bress AP, Na-Thalang K, Tsao YY, Groo VL, Deyo KL, Patel SR, Bishop JR, Bauman JL (2014). Use of a simplified nomogram to individualize digoxin dosing versus standard dosing practices in patients with heart failure. Pharmacotherapy, 34(11), 1121-31.
  11. Kane SP, Bress A, Tesoro EP (2013). Characterization of free phenytoin concentrations in neurointensive care unit patients using a revised Winter-Tozer equation. Ann Pharmacother, 47(5), 628-36.
  12. Association of aldosterone synthase polymorphism (CYP11B2 -344T>C) and genetic ancestry with atrial fibrillation and serum aldosterone in African Americans with heart failure.Bress A, Han J, Patel SR, Desai AA, Mansour I, Groo V, Progar K, Shah E, Stamos TD, Wing C, Garcia JG, Kittles R, Cavallari LH (2013). Association of aldosterone synthase polymorphism (CYP11B2 -344T>C) and genetic ancestry with atrial fibrillation and serum aldosterone in African Americans with heart failure. PLoS One, 8(7), e71268.
  13. Characterization of unbound phenytoin concentrations in neurointensive care unit patients using a revised Winter-Tozer equation.Kane SP, Bress AP, Tesoro EP (2013). Characterization of unbound phenytoin concentrations in neurointensive care unit patients using a revised Winter-Tozer equation. Ann Pharmacother, 47(5), 628-36.
  14. Feasibility of implementing a comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service.Nutescu EA, Drozda K, Bress AP, Galanter WL, Stevenson J, Stamos TD, Desai AA, Duarte JD, Gordeuk V, Peace D, Kadkol SS, Dodge C, Saraf S, Garofalo J, Krishnan JA, Garcia JG, Cavallari LH (2013). Feasibility of implementing a comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service. Pharmacotherapy, 33(11), 1156-64.
  15. Bress A, Patel SR, Perera MA, Campbell RT, Kittles RA, Cavallari LH (2012). The effect of NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1) genotype on warfarin dose requirements in Hispanic and African Americans. Pharmacogenomics, 13(16), 1939-49.
  16. Effect of NQO1 and CYP4F2 genotypes on warfarin dose requirements in Hispanic-Americans and African-Americans.Bress A, Patel SR, Perera MA, Campbell RT, Kittles RA, Cavallari LH (2012). Effect of NQO1 and CYP4F2 genotypes on warfarin dose requirements in Hispanic-Americans and African-Americans. Pharmacogenomics, 13(16), 1925-35.
  17. Bress AP, Filtz MR, Truong HA, Nalder M, Vienet M, Boyle C (2011). An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Melbourne, Australia: Practical Guidance for Global Experiences. Curr Pharm Teach Learn, 1(3), 53-62.
  18. Role of cytochrome P450 genotype in the steps toward personalized drug therapy.Cavallari LH, Jeong H, Bress A (2011). Role of cytochrome P450 genotype in the steps toward personalized drug therapy. Pharmgenomics Pers Med, 4, 123-36.
  19. Stone RH, Bress AP, Nutescu EA, Shapiro N (In Press). Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis: a retrospective cohort evaluation of thrombotic risk factors at a university teaching hospital antithrombosis clinic. Ann Pharmacother.

Review

  1. Neprilysin Inhibition in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Clinical Review.King JB, Bress AP, Reese AD, Munger MA (2015). Neprilysin Inhibition in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Clinical Review. [Review]. Pharmacotherapy, 35(9), 823-37.