Division of Infectious Diseases

The Infectious Diseases Division (a sub-specialty of internal medicine) has 12 full-time faculty at the University of Utah Medical Center and 13 affiliated faculty at LDS, IMC, and the VA hospital who are actively involved in clinical, educational, and research endeavors in infectious diseases.

Clinical Care 

Our goal is to prevent, treat and care for patients with infectious diseases in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. The division provides general ID, HIV and immunocompromised inpatient consultation services at the University of Utah Health Center and at LDS Hospital, IMC and the VA. The division also has active programs in antibiotic stewardship, infection control and early epidemic investigation.

In Clinic 1A, our providers see patients with general infectious disease problems such as osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and endocarditis. Specialty clinics, specializing in HIV, travel and tropical medicine, transplant infectious diseases, and immunology are available to better serve patients with those needs.

In addition, we run outreach clinics for HIV patients at the Utah prison and in St George and oversee the sexually transmitted disease clinic at the Salt Lake Valley Health Department.

Research

Our faculty are active in both laboratory and clinical research, with a focus on the pathogenesis of infectious diseases.

Our specific research interests include:

  1. Epstein Barr virus, Herpes Simplex Virus, HIV, and Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpes virus.
  2. Opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts especially cytomegalovirus (CMV) and invasive fungal infections.
  3. Malaria and its complications; Geosentinel surveillance of infections in returning travelers.
  4. Viral triggers of multiple sclerosis.
  5. Antibiotic resistance, MRSA, and antibiotic stewardship.
  6. Immunology of diarrheal diseases and gut dysfunction in returning travelers

Latest News

Clinical
Jul 13, 2017

University of Utah Health Receives American Hospital Association’s ‘Most Wired’ Recognition

University Hospital, ,

Technology is making it easier for patients and providers to interact, thus improving communication, safety and patient-provider relationships. New tools are helping patients become more actively involved in their care and maintaining their health, according to results of the 19th Annual Health Care’s Most Wired® survey, released today by the American Hospital Association’s (AHA) Health Forum. ... Read More

Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jul 05, 2017

Advancing Patient Bedside Monitoring

intensive care, neurosurgery, spine surgery

In the Intensive Care Unit doctors and nurses must make decisions that involve integration of massive amounts of data that is constantly changing. To cope with all this data they rely on monitors that beep and buzz alerting medical staff when a patient needs attention. At the University of Utah Hospital, bedside monitoring is being taken to a whole new level thanks to groundbreaking new software.... Read More

Neurology
Researchers Propose New Approach to Identify Genetic Mutations in Men with Prostate Cancer
Research
Jun 28, 2017

Researchers Propose New Approach to Identify Genetic Mutations in Men with Prostate Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , cancer, prostate cancer, heredity, genetics

Scientists have had limited success at identifying specific inherited genes associated with prostate cancer. Researchers studied prostate cancer patients with multiple cancer diagnoses, many who would not be recommended for genetic tests following current guidelines, to identify genetic mutations that may influence cancer risk. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Study Highlights Role of Rare Genetic Mutations in ALS
Research
Jun 22, 2017

Study Highlights Role of Rare Genetic Mutations in ALS

Clinical Neurosciences Center, , als, lou gehrig's disease

90 to 95 percent of ALS cases are “sporadic”, meaning these patients had no clear family history of the condition, and therefore no indication that they were at risk. A new study by investigators at University of Utah health shows that approximately one-fifth of these cases do have signs of a genetic predisposition toward the disease: these patients carry detrimental mutations associated with the familial form of ALS.... Read More

Neurology
From DNA to Decision-making: University of Utah Health Awarded $4 Million Toward a Comprehensive Look at Heart Birth Defects
Research
Jun 22, 2017

From DNA to Decision-making: University of Utah Health Awarded $4 Million Toward a Comprehensive Look at Heart Birth Defects

heart disease

The American Heart Association (AHA) awarded investigators at University of Utah Health $3.7 million to conduct collaborative research to prevent and treat congenital heart disease. U of U Health is one of four groups across the country to join the AHA’s Strategically Focused Research Network (SFRN) for children.... Read More

Neurobiology and Anatomy
Yarraman Flu or Horse Flu? Words and Graphics Influence Willingness to Vaccinate
Research
Jun 21, 2017

Yarraman Flu or Horse Flu? Words and Graphics Influence Willingness to Vaccinate

vaccine

“Yarraman flu is a virus quickly infecting the U.S. .…” The mock announcement was enough to make readers worry. But when the name of the hypothetical illness was changed to “horse flu”, readers reported being less motivated to get a vaccine that would prevent them from contracting the illness. The research was published as two studies in Vaccine and Emerging Infectious Diseases. ... Read More

Population Health Sciences

Division Chief Sankar Swaminathan, MD

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