School of Medicine

Medical Ethics

Visiting Speakers

Jay Baruch, MD--2017 Max & Sara Cowan Memorial Speaker

Jay Baruch, MD--2017 Max & Sara Cowan Memorial Speaker

Our 2017 Sara and Max Cowan Memorial Lecturer in Humanistic Medicine is Jay Baruch, MD. He is Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Alpert Medical School at Brown University, where he serves as the director of the Medical Humanities and Bioethics Scholarly Concentration. What's Left Out (Kent State University Press, 2015), his latest collection of shortfiction, received a ForeWord Reviews 2015 INDIEFAB Book of the Year Bronze Award in the short fiction category. His first collection of short fiction, Fourteen  Stories: Doctors, Patients, and Other Strangers, (Kent State University Press, 2007) was Honorable Mention in the short story category in ForeWord Magazine’s 2007 Book of the Year Awards. His short fiction and essays have appeared in numerous print and online medical and literary journals.

Dr. Baruch presently serves as a Director-at-Large, American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and the medical humanities section chair for the American College of Emergency Physicians. He was recently selected to receive the inaugural Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. His partnership with RISD museum educators in developing curricula for doctors in training that use museum objects to improve metacognition skills at the bedside has been presented at national medical, humanities and museum conferences. He’s created and taught multiple humanities courses at Brown University and electives at Alpert Medical School.

There will be three opportunities to see Dr. Baruch. (See descriptions, below.) We hope that you can join us for any or all of them:

Mary E. Fallat, MD--2017 David Green  Memorial Speaker

Mary E. Fallat, MD--2017 David Green Memorial Speaker

Mary E. Fallat, MD, is the 2017 David Green Memorial Speaker. Dr. Fallat is the Hirikati S. Nagaraj Professor of Surgery at the University of Louisville, Division Director of Pediatric Surgery, and Chief of Surgery at Norton Children’s Hospital where she has been in active clinical practice for nearly 30 years. Dr. Fallat has a long history of service and leadership in Pediatric Surgery. She is the recent past president of the American Pediatric Surgical Association and recent Chair of the American College of Surgeons Advisory Council for Pediatric Surgery. She is the current Secretary of the Section on Surgery of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Dr. Fallat has had several focused areas of interest during her career at the University of Louisville. She has been actively involved in the care of the trauma patient and started the first pediatric trauma service at Kosair Children’s Hospital in 1988, while simultaneously developing leadership roles in the American College of Surgeons Kentucky and National Committees on Trauma. She led the initiative in Kentucky that culminated in Trauma System Legislation in 2008. She has been continuously funded as principal or co-investigator for the KY Emergency Medical Services for Children program since 1993. She participated in the IOM project “The Future of Emergency Care in the U.S. Health System” as a member of the Subcommittee on Pediatric Emergency Care. She has twice led the initiative to revise the national Equipment for Ambulances list, integrating pediatric equipment into the list. In addition to the EMSC grant, she recently completed a grant to develop an educational program to train EMS providers how to assist family members with next steps and personally cope with pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest and death in the field.

Dr. Fallat was the Section on Surgery member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Bioethics for 9 years before ascending to the Chair position in 2009. She was the primary author for several statements including the AAP Statement on Professionalism in Pediatrics. She has written on the topics of the Do-Not- Resuscitate Patient who requires Anesthesia or Surgery, Preservation of Fertility in Children and Adolescents With Cancer, and Termination of Resuscitation in Out of Hospital Pediatric Traumatic Cardiopulmonary Arrest victims. She served as a liaison from the AAP to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology Committee on Ethics for four years and is a past Chair of the Ethics and Advocacy Committee of the American Pediatric Surgical Association. 

As the 2017 David Green Memorial Speaker, there are two opportunities to hear Dr. Fallat:

Larry D. Cripe, M.D.

Larry D. Cripe, M.D.

Larry D. Cripe, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Indiana University (IU) School of Medicine, Service Line Chief, Hematology and Oncology, IU Health Physicians. Dr. Cripe is a founding co-director of the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center’s Mary Margaret Walther Palliative Care Research and Education Program. Prior to several studies of oncologist – patient communication and end of life health care decisions of people with poor prognosis malignancies, Dr. Cripe served as principal investigator in numerous national clinical and translational trials involving the development of treatments for people with acute leukemia and related disorders. The goal of his current research is to develop computer-supported communication and decision-making frameworks to increase the likelihood that people with poor prognosis malignancies receive care consistent with their preferences and goals.

In addition, Dr. Cripe writes and reads Grace Notes, radio essays on end-of-life care, broadcast through the nationally syndicated radio program, Sound Medicine. On April 26th, Dr. Cripe  spoke to HCI Supportive Oncology Grand Rounds as well as facilitating an Evening Ethics Discussion that Evening, “Virtue Ethics and Decisions to Limit Potentially Life-Sustaining Therapies.”  

Jeffrey P. Brosco, MD, PhD--2016 David Green Memorial Speaker

Jeffrey P. Brosco, MD, PhD--2016 David Green Memorial Speaker

 
Jeffrey P. Brosco MD PhD, is the 2016 David Green Memorial Speaker. Dr. Brosco is Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Associate Director, Mailman Center for Child Development. Dr. Brosco’s research includes an analysis of the history of health care for children in early 20th century Philadelphia, the historical epidemiology of intellectual disability, and the history of newborn screening in the US. His current work integrates history, ethics, and clinical practice to forge systems-level approaches to improving child health, especially regarding large-scale screening programs.

As the 2016 David Green Memorial Speaker, there are two opportunities to hear Dr. Brosco:

Wylie Burke, MD, PhD--2016  Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Wylie Burke, MD, PhD--2016 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Wylie Burke, MD, PhD, is Professor in the Department of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of  Washington (UW). Dr. Burke is also Adjunct Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and a Member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. She served on the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetic Testing (1999-2002) and the NationalHuman Genome Advisory Council (1999-2003), and was President of the American Society of Human Genetics in 2007. She is Principal Investigator of the University of Washington Center for Genomics and Healthcare Equality, an NIH Center of Excellence in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI)  Research.

As the 2016 Sara and Max Cowan Memorial Lecturer, there are three opportunities to hear Dr. Burke:

An Algorithms of Innovation interview with Dr. Burke can also be viewed: "Genetic Testing: What's the Harm?"

Linda Ganzini, MD, MPH

Linda Ganzini, MD, MPH

Linda Ganzini, MD, MPH, is professor of psychiatry and medicine at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU).  She is Oregon's principal researcher on physician-assisted dying.  Dr. Ganzini presented an Internal Medicine Grand Rounds on October 29, 2015, "Oregon Health Care Providers' Experiences with Legalized Physician-Assisted Dying" and a noon, public lecture, also on October 29, 2015, co-sponsored by UtahPresents & the Division of Medical Ethics & Humanities, "The Oregon Death with Dignity Act: Why do Patients Request Assisted Death?"  Videos of both talks can be found here.

Dr. Ganzini also facilitated an Evening Ethics Discussion on October 28th, "Death with Dignity Laws: What do they Mean for Physicians?

Jeanne Nollman

Jeanne Nollman

Jeanne Nollman was a board member and past President for the largest intersex support group in the world, AIS-DSD (Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome-Disorders of Sex Development) for 7 years. She has spent the last 10 years educating doctors, lawyers, therapists, social workers, the criminal justice system, and students on what intersex is and how people with DSD are impacted physically and psychologically.  

Ms. Nollman spoke with 2nd year medical students in the "Layers of Medicine" course, and presented and facilitated discussion at an Evening Ethics, September 17, 2015, 5:30-7:00pm, HSEB 2120: "Intersex: The Blurred Lines of Biological Sex."

Mark Mercurio, MD, MA--2015 David Green Memorial Speaker

Mark Mercurio, MD, MA--2015 David Green Memorial Speaker

Dr. Mercurio is Director of the Program for Biomedical Ethics and the Yale Pediatric Ethics Program, Professor of Pediatrics at Yale University School of Medicine, and an attending neonatologist at Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital. He is Chair of the Pediatric Ethics Committee, and Associate Director of the Yale University Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics on the main campus. Recent work has appeared in Pediatrics, the Hastings Center Report, the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, and the Journal of Perinatology. He currently serves on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Bioethics.

Dr. Mercurio presented the following as 2015 David Green Memorial Lecturer:

  • "Unilateral physician DNAR decisions in pediatrics," an Evening Ethics Discussion, May 13, 2015, 5:30-7:00pm, Research Administration Building, room #117
  • "Ethical decision-making in the setting of extreme prematurity," Pediatric Grand Rounds, David Green Memorial Lecture, May 14, 2015,  8am, PCH,  3rd floor Auditorium
Kimberly Myers, PhD

Kimberly Myers, PhD

Kimberly Myers, Ph.D., associate professor of Humanities and English at Penn State Hershey College of Medicine, and member at the Doctors Kienle Center for Humanistic Medicine, visited the University of Utah in conjunction with the opening of the traveling art exhibit, "Edges of Light: Images of Breast Transformation. The exhibit included photographs by Wendy Palmer and verbal reflections by Kimberly Myers and will be shown at the Eccles Health Science Library April 13-May 15, 2015

Dr. Myers is the author of Illness in the Academy: A Collection of Pathographies by Academics (Purdue University Press, 2007). A book signing was held at both the Evening Ethics Discussion and at the Tanner Humanities Lecture. The following events featured Dr. Myers:

  • Lecture open to public, faculty, staff, students on Monday, April 13th, 3:30-5pm, Tanner Humanities Building, the Jewel Box, (Room 143): An Aesthetic of Illness: De/Re- Constructing Breast Cancer through Lens and Ink 
  • Supportive Oncology and Survivorship Grand Rounds, Tuesday, April 14th, 7:30 am, Huntsman Cancer Hospital Trail View Room, 6th Floor: Images of Breast Transformation: One Survivor's Project for Others on the Journey
  • Evening Ethics Discussion on Wednesday, April 15th, 5:30-7pm, Research Administration Building, 1st floor conference room:  " Intimacies of Illness: The Ethics of Self-Disclosure
Barron Lerner, MD, PhD--2014-15 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Barron Lerner, MD, PhD--2014-15 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Barron Lerner is Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine where he practices general internal medicine and teaches medical ethics and the history of medicine. His book, The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America, received the William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine and was named a most notable book by the American Library Association. Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD, calls Dr. Lerner's most recent, 2014 book, The Good Doctor: A Father, a Son, and the Evolution of Medical Ethics, "one of the most thoughtful and provocative books that I have read in a long time,” saying that it " touches on some of the most profound issues in medicine today: autonomy, medical wisdom, empathy, paternalism and the evolving roles of the doctor and patient." Dr. Lerner regularly publishes essays in scholarly journals, The New York Times, Slate and theatlantic.com and appears frequently on NPR shows such as “Fresh Air, “All Things Considered” and “Science Friday.” 

Barron Lerner presented the following for the 2014-15 Cowan Memorial Lecture Series:

Dan W. Brock, PhD--2014 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dan W. Brock, PhD--2014 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dan W. Brock, PhD, was the Frances Glessner Lee Professor of Medical Ethics in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine and Director of the Division of Medical Ethics at the Harvard Medical School. He retired from Harvard at the end of 2013.Previously he was Senior Scientist and a member of the Department of Clinical Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. Until July 2002, he was Charles C. Tillinghast, Jr. University Professor, Professor of Philosophy and Biomedical Ethics, and Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Brown University where he had a joint appointment in the Philosophy Department (of which he was Chair in 1980-86) and in the Medical School. He received his B.A. in economics from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in philosophy from Columbia University. He served as Staff Philosopher on the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine in 1981-82, and in 1993 was a member of the Ethics Working Group of the Clinton Task Force on National Health Reform. He has been a consultant in biomedical ethics and health policy to numerous national and international bodies, including the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, and the World Health Organization. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow and former Board member of the Hastings Center. He was President of the American Association of Bioethics in 1995-96, and was a founding Board Member of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He is the author of over 170 articles in bioethics and in moral and political philosophy, which have appeared in books and peer-reviewed scholarly journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Science, Hastings Center Report, Philosophy and Public Affairs, and Ethics. He is the author of Deciding For Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decision Making, 1989, (with Allen E. Buchanan), Life and Death: Philosophical Essays in Biomedical Ethics, 1993, and From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (with Allen Buchanan, Norman Daniels and Daniel Wikler) 2000, all published by Cambridge University Press. He is currently an editorial board member of 14 professional journals in ethics, bioethics and health policy, and has lectured widely at national and international conferences, professional societies, universities, and health care institutions. His current research focuses on the prioritization of health resources and rationing, with a special focus on cost-effectiveness analysis, and on genetic selection for enhancement and to prevent disability.

Dr. Brock presented the following for the 2014 Cowan Memorial Lecture Series:

  • "Moral Fictions in End of Life Care"  (Evening Ethics Discussion, Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 5:00-6:30pm, Research Administration Bldg. Rm. #117)
  • "Obstacles to Health Care Rationing" (Internal Medicine Grand Rounds, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 7:45am-8:45am, Health Sciences Education Building Rm. #1750)
  • "The Future of Bioethics--From Clinic to Population" (The Cowan Memorial Public Lecture, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 12:30-1:30, Health Sciences Education Building. Rm. 2600) 

Click here for Dr. Brock's 2014 Cowan Memorial Public Lecture from March 27, 2014: "The Future of Bioethics--From Clinic to Population"

Alex Kemper, MD, MPH, MS--2014 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Alex Kemper, MD, MPH, MS--2014 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Alex R. Kemper, MD, MPH, MS, is a general pediatrician and health services researcher at Duke University. He attended medical school and completed residency training at Duke University. He then went to the University of North Carolina for fellowship training, after which he joined the faculty at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kemper returned to Duke in 2006. His research focuses on the evaluation of screening strategies across childhood. He now chairs the Condition Review Workgroup for the Secretary's Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children and has recently become a member of the United States Preventive Services Task Force. In addition to these activities, he is the Deputy Editor of PEDIATRICS.

Dr. Kemper presented the following as 2014 David Green Memorial Lecturer:

  • "Ethical Issues in Evidence-based Medicine," an Evening Ethics Discussion, March 5, 2014, 5:30-7:00pm, Research Administration Building #117
  • "Peer-Reviewed Publication: Lessons from Pediatrics," Pediatric Grand Rounds, David Green Memorial Lecture, March 6, 8am, PCMC 3rd floor Auditorium
Alice D. Dreger, PhD--2013 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Alice D. Dreger, PhD--2013 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Alice D. Dreger, PhD, is the 2013 David Green Memorial Lecturer on May 29th-30th. Dr. Dreger is Professor of Clinical Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. She is author of Hermaphrodites and the Medical Invention of Sex and One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal (both with Harvard University Press). She has published numerous articles on the contemporary medical treatment of children born with sex anomalies in medical and bioethics journals. She also coordinated and edited the two 2006 consensus handbooks, Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Disorders of Sex Development in Childhood and the companion Parents’ Handbook. Those two handbooks represented consensus documents involving over 50 specialist clinicians, affected adults, and parents of affected individuals. In 2011, UTNE Reader named her a visionary for her work on intersex, and TED released her talk on intersex in a Netflix compilation. She is currently completing a book on scientific controversies over human identity in the Internet age.

 Dr. Dreger presented the following for this lecture series:

  • “Can We Talk about the Nuremberg Code” (Evening Ethics Discussion, Wednesday, May 29th, 5:30-7:00pm, Research Administration Building, room #117) 
  • “Surgical ‘Normalization’ for Children Born with Atypical Genitalia: Controversies, Consensuses, and the Constant Cultural Conundrum” (Pediatric Grand Rounds, David Green Memorial Lecture, Thursday, May 30th, 8am-9am, PCMC 3rd Floor Auditorium)
Marcia Angell, MD--2013 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Speaker

Marcia Angell, MD--2013 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Speaker

Marcia Angell, MD, is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, after serving as Editor-in-Chief of the New England Journal of Medicine. A graduate of Boston University School of Medicine, she trained in both internal medicine and anatomic pathology. She joined the editorial staff of the New England Journal of Medicine in 1979, became Executive Editor in 1988, and Editor-in-Chief in 1999. Dr. Angell writes frequently in professional journals and the popular media on a wide range of topics, particularly medical ethics, health policy, the nature of medical evidence, the interface of medicine and the law, care at the end of life, and the relations between industry and academic medicine. Her two books for the public, Science on Trial: The Clash of Medical Evidence and the Law in the Breast Implant Case, W. W. Norton & Company, 1996, and The Truth About the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It, Random House, 2004 (a New York Times business bestseller) have been widely read and critically acclaimed. In 1997, Time magazine named Marcia Angell one of the 25 most influential Americans, and in 2002, she won the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. 

Dr. Angell presented the following as part of the 2013 Cowan Memorial Lectureship:

2/7/13 Internal Medicine Grand Rounds: Conflicts of Interest in Medicine

2/7/13 with Arnold Relman, MD, The Cowan Public Lecture:  Medical Journals: The Good and the Bad

2/7/13 Evening Ethics Discussion: How Doctors Help Us to Die

Arnold Relman, MD--Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Speaker

Arnold Relman, MD--Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Speaker

Arnold Relman, MD, is Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He was Editor-in-chief, at the New England Journal of Medicine from 1977-91. Dr. Relman graduated from Columbia University College of Physicians in 1946, did his Residency at Yale and a Research fellowship at Boston University School of Medicine, where he eventually became Wesselhoft Professor and chief of the Boston University division of the Boston City Hospital. In 1968, he became the Frank Wister Thomas Professor and Chief of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital. He was a visiting scientist in the Department of Biochemistry and visiting Fellow at Merton College Oxford 1975-76, and in 1977, he joined the faculty at Harvard. He was Trustee at Columbia University, 1989-96; member, Board of Registration in Medicine, Massachusetts, 1995-2002; Health Professionals Health Policy Review Group for The White House, 1993, Harvard Board of Overseers for Division of Medical Sciences, 1974-77, Boston University Medical Center Trustee Council, 1978-91, and Fellow and member of the Council, the Hastings Center for Bioethics 1980-87. Until 1977, Dr. Relman did research in renal disease and acid-base and electrolyte physiology in addition to his clinical practice and teaching. Thereafter, his interest changed to medical journalism, and then to social, ethical and economic issues related to the medical profession and to healthcare policy. His 2007 book on the U.S. health system, was republished in paperback with an added commentary on the Obama Affordable Care Act in 2010 ["A Second Opinion", Public Affairs, NewYork]. He continues to write and speak about health care reform. 

Dr. Relman presented the following as part of the 2013 Cowan Memorial Lectureship:

2/6/13 Lecture:  Can U.S. Healthcare be Rescued, and By Whom?

2/7/13 with Marcia Angell, MD, The Cowan Public Lecture:  Medical Journals: The Good and the Bad

Click Here for videotapes of the three 2013 Cowan Lectures.

Celia B. Fisher, PhD--2012 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Celia B. Fisher, PhD--2012 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Fisher is the Marie Ward Doty Chair and Professor of Psychology, and founding Director of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education. She is past Chair of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Human Studies Review Board, a past member of the DHHS Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP; and co-chair of the SACHRP Subcommittee on Children’s Research) and a founding editor of the journal Applied Developmental Science. For her work promoting the protection of vulnerable, marginalized, and at-risk participants in research, Dr. Fisher has been awarded the Health Improvement Institute's Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Human Research Protection. Dr. Fisher presented the following as our David Green Memorial Lecturer: 

On 4/4/12, an Evening Ethics Discussion entitled "Marginalized Populations and Addiction Research"

On 4/5/12, The Pediatric Grand Rounds Lecture entitled "Ethics in Environmental Research Involving Children"

On 4/5/12, for the 4th year medical student medical ethics course, a lecture entitled "Informational Risk in Research Involving Genetic Testing"

Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH, MA--2012 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH, MA--2012 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Jeremy Sugarman is the Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Bioethics and Medicine, professor of medicine, professor of Health Policy and Management, and deputy director for medicine of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at the Johns Hopkins University. He is an internationally recognized leader in the field of biomedical ethics with particular expertise in the application of empirical methods and evidence-based standards for the evaluation and analysis of bioethical issues. His contributions to both medical ethics and policy include his work on the ethics of informed consent, umbilical cord blood banking, stem cell research, international HIV prevention research, and research oversight. Dr. Sugarman is the author of over 200 articles, reviews and book chapters. He has also edited or co-edited four books (Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research; Ethics of Research with Human Subjects: Selected Policies and Resources; Ethics in Primary Care; and Methods in Medical Ethics

As our 2012 Cowan Memorial Lecturer, Dr. Sugarman presented the following: 

An Evening Ethics Discussion on 3/14/12: “Ethics and Best Practice Guidelines for Training Experiences in Global Health.” 

An Internal Medicine Grand Rounds on 3/15/12: “Ethics, Evidence, and Policies regarding disclosure of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Research” 

The Cowan Memorial Public Lecture on 3/15/12: " Stem Cell Research: The Debate Continues”

Ruth Macklin, PhD--2011 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Ruth Macklin, PhD--2011 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Ruth Macklin is Professor of Bioethics in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York, USA.  She is a member of the Vaccine Advisory Committee and the Research Proposal Review Panel at the World Health Organization, and an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academies of Science. She is a past president of the International Association of Bioethics and is currently a member of its Board of Directors. Dr. Macklin is author or editor of 11 books and has more than 200 published articles.“ Dr. Macklin presented two lectures on May 5, 2011: Internal Medicine Grand Round, "Research in disaster settings: studying vulnerable subjects,” and the Cowan Memorial Public Lecture, "Women’s Health: Inequalities in Developing Countries." She also facilitated and Evening Ethics Discussion on May 4, 2011, " Intertwining Biomedical Research and Public Health in HIV Microbicide Research.”

Christine Mitchell, RN, MS, MTS, FAAN --2011 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Christine Mitchell, RN, MS, MTS, FAAN --2011 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Christine Mitchell is Associate Director of Clinical Ethics in the Division of Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School. She developed and runs an annual Harvard Bioethics Course, leads the monthly Harvard Ethics Consortium, teaches in the ethics fellowship program, and organized and co-chairs the Ethics Leadership Council for the Harvard teaching hospitals and affiliated health care facilities. Her current research, with Judy Johnson and Bob Truog, is focused on evaluation of ethics consultation.

Ms. Mitchell is also Director of the Office of Ethics at Children where she co-chairs the hospital ethics consultation service. She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees in nursing at Boston University and a Masterat Harvard.
As a founding Board member of the Society for Bioethics Consultation and past President of the American Society for Law, Medicine and Ethics, Ms. Mitchell has been involved with ethics committees nationally and locally since the 1980s, including the development of a Community Ethics Committee which she organized in 2007 to bring public voices into discussion of ethical issues concerning palliative sedation, non-therapeutic CPR, provider-patient interactions via social media, and other topics. She also serves on the clinical ethics consultation committee of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities which is proposing certification of ethics consultants.

Ms. Mitchell has made documentary films related to clinical ethics, including one which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1984, and a video for which she and film-maker Ben Achtenberg won a Freddie award in 2004. She has written a number of articles on ethics which have been published in the American Journal of Nursing, The Journal of Clinical Ethics, the New England Journal of Medicine, and Newsweek. Articles about her have appeared in Reader's Digest and Yankee Magazine.
Ms. Mitchell facilitated an Evening Ethics Discussion on "Legal Strategies for Handling Conflict about Non-Therapeutic Medical Treatments," presented at Primary Children's Grand Rounds, "Withdrawing Food and Fluid in Pediatrics: the same or different?" and presented in the 4th year medical ethics course at the University of Utah School of Medicine, "Who Me? Taking and Transferring Moral Responsibility within Teams."

Robert "Skip" Nelson, MD, PhD--2010 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Robert "Skip" Nelson, MD, PhD--2010 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Robert M. Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., is currently the Pediatric Ethicist in the Office of Pediatric Therapeutics, Office of the Commissioner at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. After receiving his M.D. degree from Yale University, Dr. Nelson trained in pediatrics (Massachusetts General Hospital), neonatology and pediatric critical care (University of California, San Francisco).  He has a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School and a Ph.D. in The Study of Religion from Harvard University. Dr. Nelson is a former Chair of the FDA Pediatric Advisory Committee and the Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee. He was a member of the Subcommittee on Research Involving Children of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections, and the Human Studies Review Board of the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Nelson was a member of the Committee on Clinical Research Involving Children of the Institute of Medicine, and former Chair of the Committee on Bioethics of the American Academy of Pediatrics.  Immediately prior to joining FDA, he was Professor of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pediatrics at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Nelson’s academic research explored various aspects of child assent and parental permission and was funded by the Greenwall Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Nelson presented "The Promise and Peril of Personalized Medicine" at Pediatric Grand Rounds, led an Evening Ethics Discussion on "The Concept of Voluntary Consent," and presented "Ethical Issues in Early Phase Clinical Trials in Pediatrics" to the 4th year medical ethics students at the University of Utah School of Medicine.

Matthew K. Wynia, MD, MPH, FACP--2010 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Matthew K. Wynia, MD, MPH, FACP--2010 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Wynia is an internist, a specialist in infectious diseases and Director of the Institute for Ethics at the American Medical Association.  Dr. Wynia oversees the Institute’s Online Fellowship and Visiting Scholars Programs and a wide range of research projects, on topics including: physician professionalism; ethics and epidemics; market pressures in medicine; the roles of codes of ethics; medicine and the holocaust; inequities in health and health care; and how demographics and technology will change medical practice.Dr. Wynia is the author of more than 125 published articles, book chapters and reports and a book on fairness in health care benefit design. His work has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Health Affairs and other leading medical and ethics journals. He is contributing editor for bioethics and public health at American Journal of Bioethics. He has been a guest on ABC News Nightline, the BBC World Service, and other programs. In addition to his work at the AMA, Dr. Wynia is a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH), and has chaired the Ethics Forum of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and the Ethics Committee of the Society for General Internal Medicine (SGIM). He cares for patients at the University of Chicago Hospital, where he is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases. As 2010 Cowan Memorial Lecturer, Dr. Wynia presented an Internal Medicine Grand Rounds, "Pay for performance and physician professionalism," the (public) Cowan Memorial Lecture, "Ethics and Organizational Quality Improvement," and he facilitated an Evening Ethics Discussion, "What sorts of regulatory structures for new drug testing will provide the greatest likelihood of optimal social benefits?"  based on his work with David Boren, "Better regulation of industry-sponsored clinical trials is long overdue," J Law Med Ethics. 2009; 37(3): 410-19.

Ellen Wright Clayton, JD, MD--2009 David J. Green, MD Memorial Lecture

Ellen Wright Clayton, JD, MD--2009 David J. Green, MD Memorial Lecture

Ellen Wright Clayton is an internationally respected leader in the field of law and genetics and holds appointments in both the law and medical schools at Vanderbilt, were she also directs the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society. She has published two books and more than 60 scholarly articles and chapters in medical journals, interdisciplinary journals and law journals on the intersection of law, medicine and public health.  In addition, she has collaborated with faculty and students throughout Vanderbilt and in many institutions around the country on interdisciplinary research projects.  An active participant in policy debates, she advises the National Human Genome Research Institute as well as other federal and international bodies on an array of topics ranging from children's health to the ethical conduct of research involving human subjects.  Dr. Clayton presented "Return of Results in Genet(om)ics Research" for Pediatric Grand Rounds, led an Evening Ethics Discussion on "Vanderbilt's innovative tissue banking effort, including ethical, legal and regulatory aspects," and presented a lecture in the Fourth Year Medical Ethics course at the University of Utah School of Medicine on "Ethical Challenges in Reporting Domestic Violence."

Paul Appelbaum, MD, PhD--2008 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Paul Appelbaum, MD, PhD--2008 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Paul Appelbaum, MD, is Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine & Law; and Director, Division of Psychiatry, Law, and Ethics, Dept. of Psychiatry, Columbia University. Dr. Apelbaum is the author of many articles and books on law and ethics in clinical practice. He is Past President of the American Psychiatric Association, the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, and the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society, and serves as Chair of the Council on Psychiatry and Law for the American Psychiatric Association.

He is currently a member of the MacArthur Foundation Network on Mandatory Outpatient Treatment. He has received the Isaac Ray Award of the American Psychiatric Association for "outstanding contributions to forensic psychiatry and the psychiatric aspects of jurisprudence," was the Fritz Redlich Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

As our 2008 Cowan Lecturer, Dr. Appelbaum presented "Therapeutic Misconception in Clinical Research" at Internal Medicine Grand Rounds, "Suicide and Violence on Campus: Legal and Ethical Issues in a free, public lecture, and joined in an Evening Ethics discussion on his article, "Voluntariness of Consent to Research."

For a link to video of these two lectures: http://stream.utah.edu/m/show_grouping.php?g=991d6f289b137b877

18th Annual Intermountain Medical Ethics Conference

Setting Priorities For Healthcare in Utah: What Choices Are We Ready to Make?

Susan Dorr Goold, MD,MHSA, MA

Susan Dorr Goold, MD,MHSA, MA

Susan Dorr Goold, MD,MHSA, MA is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine and Director of the Bioethics Program at the University of Michigan, where she earned her medical degree and her master’s in Health Management and Policy. She did her internal medicine residency at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research focuses on allocation of scarce health care resources, especially the priorities of patients and the public. Her projects, using an allocation simulation exercise, CHAT (Choosing Health Plans All Together), have involved educators, community organizations, employer groups, and others in over twenty states and several countries. She has served on editorial boards of the Annals of Internal Medicine, American Journal of Bioethics, the MIT Press, and Rowman and Littlefield, and on the boards for the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and the International Society on Priorities in Health Care. In 2007 she was appointed to the American Medical Association’s Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs.

Marjorie Ginsburg, MPH

Marjorie Ginsburg, MPH

Marjorie Ginsburg, MPH, is founder and Executive Director of Sacramento Healthcare Decisions (SHD). An independent nonprofit organization formed in 1994, its purpose is to involve the public in improving healthcare policy and practice. For the past eight years, her work has focused primarily on identifying societal decisions on the use of finite healthcare resources. She also works with other states in their efforts to involve citizens in setting coverage priorities. Marge currently serves on NCQA’s Committee on Performance Measurement; the board of Integrated Healthcare Association; California Technology Assessment Forum and California Hospital Assessment & Reporting Task Force (CHART). Previously, she was co-chair of the California Coalition for Compassionate Care and served on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Advisory Committee for its initiative Community-State Partnerships to Improve End-of-Life Care. Prior to moving to Sacramento in 1990, she spent 15 years in management and administration of community-based geriatric services in San Francisco.

Dr. Allan Ainsworth

Dr. Allan Ainsworth

Dr. Allan Ainsworth received his Ph.D. in medical anthropology at the University of Utah in 1984. He has worked with marginalized peoples for the last 30 years, including projects with the Zuni Tribe of New Mexico, the Hopi Tribe of Arizona, and the Tulalip Tribes and Quinault Tribe of Washington State.

Allan is currently the executive director of Wasatch Homeless Health Care, Inc., a position he has held since 1988. He is a member of the American Anthropological Association, the Society for Medical Anthropology and a Fellow of the Association of Applied Anthropology. He also holds an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Utah and facilitates classes for first and second-year medical students in social medicine for the School of Medicine.

Allan is past chair of the Board of Directors of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council and sits on a number of state and local boards in Utah. He received the National Association of Community Health Centers’ Elizabeth K. Cooke Advocacy MVP Award in March of 2008.

Dr. David N. Sundwall

Dr. David N. Sundwall

In January 2005, Dr. David N. Sundwall was nominated by Governor Jon Huntsman Jr. to serve as Executive Director of the Utah State Department of Health (UDOH) and confirmed by the State Senate. In this capacity he supervises a workforce of almost 1,000 employees with a budget of approximately $2.0 billion. He currently serves as President of Association of State & Territorial Health Officers (ASHTO), serves on the Executive Committee of ASTHO and represents this organization on the National Governor’s Association’s (NGA) State e-Health Alliance.Dr Sundwall has extensive experience in federal government and national health policy, including: Chairman of the CDC’s Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee; Chairman of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME); Administrator, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); Assistant Surgeon General in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service; Co-Chairman of the HHS Secretary’s Task Force on Medical Liability and Malpractice, and was the Secretary’s designee to the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality. He has also served as Health Staff Director of the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee.

Dr. Sundwall is Board certified in Internal Medicine and Family Practice. He is licensed to practice medicine in the District of Columbia and Utah and currently volunteers weekly at a UDOH public health clinic for the underserved in Salt Lake City. Dr. Sundwall has academic appointments at three medical schools: the University of Utah, Georgetown University School of Medicine and the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences.

Benjamin Wilfond, M.D. - 2008 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Benjamin Wilfond, M.D. - 2008 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Wilfond is Professor and Chief of the Division of Bioethics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine.  He directs the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics which is co-sponsored by Children's Hospital.  He is also Adjunct Professor in the Department of Medical History and Ethics.

Dr. Wilfond's program provides consultation and education, studies ethical issues in pediatric care and research, and trains clinicians in Pediatric Bioethics.  Research projects focus on recruitment for research, cognitive disabilities, genetic testing, biobanks, global health, and ethics quality improvement.  Dr. Wilfond was formerly the Head of the Bioethics and Social Policy Unit at the NIH National Genome Research Institute and Deputy Director of the Institute's Bioethics core.  After his pediatric residency and pulmonary fellowship at the University of Wisconsin, he served on the faculty at the University of Arizona and Johns Hopkins.  Dr. Wilfond's grants and publications address many ethical issues, but especially those in clinical and genetic research and treatment that involve infants and children.

Dr. Wilfond facilitated an Evening Ethics on "Waiving Informed Consent in Newborn Screening Research: Balancing Social Value and Respect", presented at Pediatric Grand Rounds at Primary Children's Medical Center, on "Show Me the Money" Financial Considerations and Ethical Implications in Responding to Parental Requests for Medical Interventions in Children with Profound Disabilities," and presented in the 2008 Senior Medical Ethics course on "Growth attenuation in children with profound disabilities: Best interests, parental decision-making, and community impact."

Paul Wolpe, M.D., Ph.D. -  2007 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Paul Wolpe, M.D., Ph.D. - 2007 Max and Sara Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Dr. Paul Wolpe, PhD, is Associate Professor of  Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in the Department of Medical Ethics and the Department of Sociology. He is President of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and is Co-Editor of the American Journal of Bioethics. Dr. Wolpe serves as the first Chief of Bioethics for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

As our 2007 Cowan lecturer, Dr. Wolpe presented Borrowing Our Bodies: The Vexing Ethics of Human Medical Research for Internal Medicine Grand Rounds on Thursday, November 15, 2007 and a public lecture that same day entitled Boomers and Biotech: How the Needs of America's Biggest Cohort Drive Biotechnology. That evening, he facilitated our Evening Ethics Program on Neurocognitive Enhancement: What Can We Do and What Should We Do?

Atul Gawande

Atul Gawande

Atul Gawande is Assistant Professor of Surgery and Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health.  He is a staff writer on medicine and science for the New Yorker.  He is also author of the award winning book, Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science, and Better: A Surgeons Notes on Performance.  Dr. Gawande spoke at the Huntsman Cancer Institute Auditorium at 4 p.m. on Friday, August 24th.

17th Annual Intermountain Medical Ethics ConferenceEpidemics: Ethics, Edicts and Economics

The media has raised public awareness and concern about the inevitability of another global epidemic of influenza.  Many readers and viewers react at a personal level wondering what is the risk to us and what can we do to prevent it.  Our conference addressed the probable situation where most cases cannot be prevented or treated. In that circumstance many millions will be ill, millions will die, billions of dollars will be lost, our economy and infrastructure will be severely affected, and ethical principles will be stretched or ignored.  The conference explored how to assess and minimize human and economic losses and how to design and implement legal and policy measures that work to preserve public health with minimal compromise of human rights.  We explored the ethical challenges and sought an ethical formula within which government, health care institutions, and health care providers can respond to a disease catastrophe of unprecedented magnitude.

Mark A. Rothstein, J.D.

Mark A. Rothstein, J.D.

Mark Rothstein holds the Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and is Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He received his B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh and his J.D. from Georgetown University. Professor Rothstein is a leading authority on the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics, privacy, occupational health, employment law, and public health law. He is Chair of the Subcommittee on Privacy and Confidentiality of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, the statutory advisory committee to the Secretary of Health and Human Services on health information policy, including the  privacy regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. He is the immediate past-President of the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics. He is the author or editor of 19 books. His latest book is Genetics: Ethics, Law and Policy (with Andrews & Mehlman).  

Chris Feudtner - 2007 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Chris Feudtner - 2007 David Green Memorial Lecturer

Our 2007 David Green Memorial Lecturer,  Chris Feudtner, M.D., Ph.D., M. P. H, is Assistant Professor  of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Feudtner focuses on how to improve the quality of life for children with complex chronic conditions and how to counsel and support their families.  Dr. Feudtner is the Director of Research for the Pediatric Advanced Care Team and the Integrated Care Service  at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.  His research interests are in   ethics and the history and sociology of medicine.  His interests are reflected in his book, Bittersweet: Diabetes, Insulin, and the Transformation of Illness (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2003).  Dr. Feudtner facilitated an Evening Ethics Discussion: “Likely Common Biases and Efforts at Debiasing in Clinical Ethics."  He will present Pediatric Grand Rounds: “Beyond Decision Making: Ethics and the Everyday of Pediatric Palliative Care”  and also present “Ethics in a Short White Coat” to the 4th year Medical Students.

Lainie Ross, M.D., Ph.D.

Lainie Ross, M.D., Ph.D.

We were fortunate once again this year to have an outstanding and distinguished visitor present the David Green Memorial Lectures. Lainie Ross, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at the University of Chicago. Her medical degree is from the University of Pennsylvania and her Doctorate in Philosophy is from Yale. She is a medical ethicist and Associate Director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics and serves on the American Academy of Pediatrics section on bioethics, and the American Philosophical Association section on medicine and philosophy.

Her academic interests are diverse and focus on research ethics, genetics, transplantation, and pediatric ethics. She is currently working on a NIH funded grant on newborn screening. She presented Pediatric Grand Rounds on April 20, 2006 where her topic was: “Children in Medical Research: Has the Pendulum Swung Too Far?” Later that day she made a presentation to our senior medical students in their medical ethics course entitled: “The Science, Ethics and Politics of Stem Cells.”

On the evening before her lectures, she facilitated our Evening Ethics Discussion which focused on an article she wrote and a number of thoughtful responses published with it in the Journal of Clinical Ethics. The subject for discussion is “Doctor if this were your child, what would you do?”.

16th Annual Intermountain Medical Ethics Conference
Rethinking Death: A Conference on Meaning, Ethics, and Policy Issues in Death and Dying

New issues in brain biology, end of life options, high profile cases of brain death and chronic vegetative state, and new criteria for organ donation, have refocused public and medical attention on death and dying. At our conference, leading experts on health law, religious ethics, health policy, and end-of-life medical practice, taught about and explored these complex but singularly important challenges.

Stuart Youngner, M.D.

Stuart Youngner, M.D.

Dr. Youngner is currently Chair of the Department of Bioethics at Case Western Reserve University, and the Susan E. Watson Professor of Bioethics.

Dr. Youngner is a nationally and internationally recognized scholar in biomedical ethics and has published and spoken on topics including: decisions to limit life-sustaining treatment, ethics committees, physician-assisted suicide, advance directives, definitions of death, and ethical issues in organ retrieval and transplantation. He served as President of the Society for Bioethics Consultation from 1994-1997 and is a founding member of the Board of Directors of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities.

Dr. Youngner has published over 70 articles in peer-reviewed scholarly journals. He is the editor or coeditor of six books, including the recently released The Definition of Death: Contemporary Controversies (Johns Hopkins). Dr. Youngner also holds an appointment as Professor Invitado at the Instituto Superior de Ciencias Medicas in Havana, Cuba.

Laurie Zoloth, Ph.D.

Laurie Zoloth, Ph.D.

Dr. Zoloth is Professor of Medical Ethics and Humanities at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine, and of Religion in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. At the Feinberg School, she also serves as Director of the Center for Bioethics, Science, and Society. From 1995-2003, she was Professor of Ethics and Director of the Program in Jewish Studies at San Francisco State University. In 2001, she was the President of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. She is a member of the NASA National Advisory Council, the nation's highest civilian advisory board for NASA; The NASA Planetary Protection Advisory Committee; the Executive Committee of the International Society for Stem Cell Research; and she is the Chair of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Bioethics Advisory Board.

Mette Rurup, Ph.D.

Mette Rurup, Ph.D.

Dr. Rurup received her PhD in medical biology in September 2005 from the Department of Public and Occupational Health at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam where she received a scholarship as a board member of the study association. Her PhD thesis was about people who request euthanasia or assisted suicide because they are 'weary of life', and about people with advance directives for euthanasia. She is currently continuing her post doctoral research at the VU University Medical Center on euthanasia, older people with a wish to die, and advance directives. She has published several publications in peer-reviewed journals on these subjects.

Jonathon Moreno, Ph.D.  - 2006 Cowan Memorial Lecturer

Jonathon Moreno, Ph.D. - 2006 Cowan Memorial Lecturer

We were indeed fortunate to have as our 2006 Cowan Memorial Lecturer Jonathan D. Moreno, Ph.D.. He is the Emily Davie and Joseph S. Kornfeld Professor of Bioethics and Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia. Dr. Moreno is a Past President of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and a Fellow of the Hastings Center and the New York Human Research Protection Advisory Committee and a Senior Consultant for the National Bioethics Advisory Commission and has advised the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

A prolific author and persuasive speaker, Dr. Moreno's work is often quoted in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. He himself has appeared on all of the network evening news programs and NPR's All Things Considered and Science Friday. During his visit, he drew upon work from his recent books: Is There an Ethicist in the House?, Undue Risks: Secret State Experiments on Humans and his soon to be published book Mind Wars: National Security and the Brain.