PRE-CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

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SCHEDULE:

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

PRECONFERENCE

No Additional Fee for Conference Registrants!

THEMES:

Early Career

Methods

Statistical Methods

Implementation & Dissemination

1:00PM - 2:30PM

"Addiction Health Services Research:  NIH Funding Opportunities for Early Career Investigators"

Dr. Lori Ducharme & Dr. Tisha Wiley 

“Research Collaboration with States -Opportunities to Shape Addiction Treatment Systems”

Dr. Sharon Reif, Session Organizer

"Introduction to causal effects estimation and strategies for handling selection bias in substance use research”

Dr. Beth Ann Griffin

RAND Corp., RAND Center for Causal Inference

“Implementation Science”

Dr. Lindsey Zimmerman

2:30PM - 3:00PM

BREAK

3:00PM - 4:30PM

"Tips to Launch a Successful Career for Early Investigators"

Dr. Constance M. Horgan & Dr. Haiden Huskamp 

Sponsored by the Brandeis-Harvard NIDA Center to Improve Systems Performance for Substance Use Disorder Treatment (P30 DA035772).

“Understanding the economic impact of multisite and multisystem interventions: budget impact, cost effectiveness, and cost savings of implementation and treatment interventions addressing substance use disorders”

Dr. Sean M. Murphy & Dr. Kathryn McCollister

"Introduction to causal mediation methods for substance use research”

Dr. Donna Coffman

“How to Get Published in Addiction Science”

Dr. Richard Saitz & Dr. Allison Lin

5:00PM - 7:00PM

AHSR 2019 OPENING RECEPTION

"Utah Elevated - A Western Dinner Under the Stars"

utah elevated dinner

Live music from Park City local band Small House Strings!

Listen to some of their music before coming to AHSR 2019 here.

7:00PM - 8:30PM 

"The Providers" Film Screening

WORKSHOPS:

JUMP TO:

Early Career

Methods

Statistical Methods

Implementation & Dissemination

THEME: Early Career

Session Title & Presenter: 

 Session Description: 

"Addiction Health Services Research:  NIH Funding Opportunities for Early Career Investigators"

Dr. Lori Ducharme & Dr. Tisha Wiley 

In this workshop, program staff from NIDA and NIAAA will describe new and recurring funding opportunities for addiction health services research.  Emphasis will be placed on mechanisms that support new and early career investigators, including fellowship and career development awards (F’s and K’s), and strategies for getting your first research grant (R’s). The workshop will include general grantsmanship advice, including understanding NIH policies for new investigators, working with program officers, common issues in review, and an overview of the funding process.  Ample time will be reserved for participant Q&A.

Tips to Launch a Successful Career for Early Investigators"

Dr. Constance M. Horgan & Dr. Haiden Huskamp 

Sponsored by the Brandeis-Harvard NIDA Center to Improve Systems Performance for Substance Use Disorder Treatment (P30 DA035772).

This pre-conference session will include a panel of senior researchers from a variety of settings (e.g., academia, research/consulting firms) to give "nuts and bolts" guidance to new researchers interested in learning more about opportunities for research both in and beyond academia. Topics will include setting priorities for the range of opportunities that arise across research, teaching and service; collaborating with other researchers; collaborating in community and other settings; writing manuscripts and grant reviews; identifying and evaluating grant opportunities. We will leave ample time for questions and discussion. This workshop is sponsored by the Brandeis-Harvard NIDA Center to Improve System Performance for Substance Use Disorder Treatment, and would complement to a symposium or workshop on grantsmanship.

 

THEME: Methods

Session Title & Presenter: 

 Session Description: 

Research Collaboration with States -Opportunities to Shape Addiction Treatment Systems”

Dr. Sharon Reif, Session Organizer

 

Collaboration between researchers and states has a history of producing fruitful findings that contribute to shaping addiction treatment systems.  During this pre-conference session, presenters will build on their experience with these collaborations to present information on the range of opportunities for such relationships; the strengths that each party brings to the table; federal, state and foundation sources of funding; practical advice for researchers on how to identify appropriate state agencies and for states on how to identify interested researchers; how to initiate and build a partnership; and examples of specific projects. Next, a panel of several sets of researchers and state representatives who have worked together will discuss the opportunities, advantages, rewards and challenges of their partnerships. By bringing together researchers and state representatives in this session, there will be an opportunity for targeted networking. This workshop is sponsored by the Brandeis-Harvard NIDA Center to Improve System Performance for Substance Use Disorder Treatment.

“Understanding the economic impact of multisite and multisystem interventions: budget impact, cost effectiveness, and cost savings of implementation and treatment interventions addressing substance use disorders”

Dr. Sean M. Murphy & Dr. Kathryn McCollister

 

Reducing the burden of substance use disorder on individuals and society requires increased access to evidence-based interventions to help individuals successfully link to treatment and engage in a long-term recovery support protocol. The opioid crisis has put a spotlight on the importance of implementing evidence-based practices across multiple levels, ranging from expanding access to medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) through local treatment providers to expanding the supply and distribution of naloxone by coordinating efforts across multiple systems within a state (e.g. behavioral health, medical care, criminal justice, education, welfare). Changing current practices requires not only clinical evidence, but also consideration of additional costs and the reallocation of existing resources that will result from the changes. Economic evaluation complements clinical studies of intervention effectiveness, as well as studies of implementation success by providing tools and methods for estimating costs and cost effectiveness of new interventions/practices. This workshop will provide a brief overview of economic evaluation methods (e.g., micro-costing, cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-benefit analysis) and describe unique aspects pertaining to the economics of implementation. The intended audience includes clinicians and administrators actively involved in behavioral health services delivery, as well as health services researchers and social scientists with expertise in comparative effectiveness studies and/or implementation science. Attendees will have the opportunity to work through exercises on the estimation of implementation intervention costs by phase and the application of cascade/process-oriented metrics in a cost effectiveness framework. Statistical considerations for cost-effectiveness analysis of multisite and multisystem designs will be discussed. The role of context – organizational and environmental – in interpreting cost effectiveness results and informing sustainability of evidence-based practices will also be presented.  

 

THEME: Statistical Methods

Session Title & Presenter: 

 Session Description: 

 

"Introduction to causal effects estimation and strategies for handling selection bias in substance use research”

Dr. Beth Ann Griffin

RAND Corp., RAND Center for Causal Inference

Although randomized trials are the gold standard, there are many important substance use health services and policy questions that can be addressed using observational data. Drawing unbiased inferences from observational data relies on the use of appropriate statistical methods, such as causal inference methods, to account for the non-randomized design.  This workshop aims to promote the use of causal inference methods to improve substance use researchers’ ability to conduct robust analyses of observational data. Dr. Griffin will describe the motivation for and an overview of causal inference methods, particularly focusing on propensity score techniques. She will then review step-by-step guidelines on how to implement propensity score weighting when interest lies in comparing two groups, showcasing a new menu-driven app in Shiny that can be used to implement these analyses. Code in R, SAS, and Stata will also be shared. Attendees should have some familiarity with running regression models but advanced statistical expertise is not required to use the techniques described in this short course.

 

"Introduction to causal mediation methods for substance use research”

Dr. Donna Coffman

As recognized by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), finding truly effective treatment for addiction and substance abuse requires not only knowing that a treatment works on average for a population, but also knowing the mechanisms or pathways through which a treatment works. Such information allows for existing treatments to be refined and improved. Commonly use mediational analysis applied in substance abuse treatment research tends to rely on either structural equation modeling (SEM) or Baron & Kenny’s 3-stage regression approach to test for mechanisms but these traditional approaches require stringent assumptions that may often fail in practice. This workshop will introduce attendees to more robust “causal mediation” methods for testing for mediation in substance use research (e.g., which can be used to what are the mechanisms or pathways through which treatments or policies might work). She will also provide step-by-step guidelines and code for implementation of the proposed causal mediation methods for attendees. Attendees should have some familiarity with running regression models but advanced statistical expertise is not required to use the techniques described in this short course.

 

THEME: Implementation & Dissemination

Session Title & Presenter: 

 Session Description: 

 

“Modeling to Learn: Helping care teams improve implementation of medication assisted therapies for alcohol and opioid use disorders”

Dr. Lindsey Zimmerman & Dr. David Lounsbury

 

This workshop will demonstrate the use of participatory system dynamics to improve the implementation of medication assisted therapies (MAT) for alcohol and opioid use disorders. At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to identify key system dynamics that facilitate or constrain implementation of MAT for AUD and OUD, which vary as a function of local patient demand for services and local staffing resources.

 

“How to Get Published in Addiction Science”

Dr. Richard Saitz & Dr. Allison Lin

Publication is a key contributor to advancing science, improving prevention and treatment, and to advancing research careers. Yet often learning about publishing is by an apprenticeship model. While that model can be effective, competing agendas can interfere with learning about authorship and other publishing decisions. Resources to support publishing now abound. Publishing Addiction Science (a free textbook in its 3rd edition) was published in 2017 covering how to select journals, prepare papers, review articles and address ethical issues. The National Institutes of Health recently published guidance on avoiding predatory publishers. The International Society of Addiction Journal Editors (ISAJE) updated the Farmington Consensus, a guide that encourages quality publishing. This session, with an intended audience of those early in their publishing careers, will cover choosing the right journal, preparing your paper for submission, revising your paper, conflicts of interest, predatory journals and publishers, and other ethical issues. We will also discuss the culture of academic publishing and tips for getting your paper published. The focus will be peer-reviewed journals but if participants are interested, we will also discuss chapters, reports, books and other outlets. Dr. Saitz is professor of community health sciences and medicine at Boston University, associate editor of JAMA, and Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Addiction Medicine. Co-presenter Dr. Lin is assistant professor of psychiatry at University of Michigan and editorial fellow at Journal of Addiction Medicine; she will provide an earlier career perspective. There will be plenty of opportunity to discuss participant questions and the real challenges they have faced. By the end of the session, participants should have a good sense of how (and how not) to interact with journals and their editors, and how to publish addiction science.