School of Medicine

Orthopaedics

NIH Support

University Orthopaedic Center

BIOMECHANICS OF REVERSE TOTAL SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY

R01                                                                                                   05/01/2016 – 04/30/2021                              $1,962,850

Principle Investigator: Heath Henhinger, PhD                               

Co-Investigators: Robert Tashjian, MD; Andrew Anderson, PhD; Kenneth “Bo” Forman, PhD

Collaborator: Robert Burks, MD

Statistician: Yue Zhang, PhD

Dr. Heath Henninger has been awarded an NIH R01 award from the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. The award titled, “Biomechanics of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty” will be funded for five (5) years. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty relieves pain and improves function in individuals with a deficient rotator cuff, but highly variable outcomes can result in lost post-operative range of motion and complications like scapular notching. This research will broaden our understanding of in vivo shoulder kinematics, their change over time during post-operative recovery, and the origins deficient arm external rotation. The results of this research will be used to enhance clinical techniques and implant design focused on increasing long-term achievable range of motion and functional outcomes after reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS DRIVING SYNOVIAL SARCOMAGENESIS

R01                                                                                                   03/01/2017-02/28/2022                                $1,743,790

Principle Investigators: Kevin B. Jones, MD, PhD; Brad Cairns, PhD

Other Key Personnel: Jared J. Barrott, PhD; David Nix, PhD; Bret Milash, PhD; Kenneth Boucher, PhD; Jay Gertz, PhD

Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive and deadly soft-tissue cancer that is driven by the expression of single, novel gene, whose protein repurposes cellular machinery to control how other genes are packaged and either silenced or activated. This proposal investigates the necessity to tumor formation of this partnering machinery, its function when repurposed in synovial sarcoma, and the genes it targets for silencing and activation, using a unique mouse genetic model of the disease and human sarcoma specimens for validation and prioritization of findings.

POPULATION-BASED SHAPE AND BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF HIP PATHOANATOMY

R01                                                                                                   08/01/2013 – 07/31/2018                              $1,334,658

Principle Investigator: Andrew Anderson, PhD

Co-Investigators: Ross Whitaker, PhD; Christopher Peters, MD; Jeffrey Weiss, PhD

In this research, we will expand and integrate statistical shape analysis and biomechanics software to study the relationship between 3D anatomy and mechanical function. We will make the software publically available and use it to investigate Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) and Dysplasia, two diseases believed to cause hip osteoarthritis. The research will improve the diagnosis and treatment of FAI and dysplasia.

IMPROVING PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOME MEASURES FOR ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

U01                                                                                                   09/15/2014 – 7/31/2018                                 $590,040

Principle Investigator: Man Hung, PhD

Co-Investigators: Charles Saltzman, MD; Tom Greene, PhD

The major goals in treating musculoskeletal system disorders are to decrease pain and improve function. There are many existing patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments that measure pain and function related to various musculoskeletal conditions. Yet meaningful interpretation of these instruments is often lacking. To our knowledge, there are no published reports regarding the responsiveness and minimal clinically importance difference of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Information System (PROMIS) instruments for the orthopaedic patient population. Furthermore, measurements from different PRO instruments cannot be directly compared. Our overall goal is to provide a clear clinical interpretation of the PRO instruments used in musculoskeletal care and research.

IN VIVO ARTHROKINEMATICS OF TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT AND ANKLE ARTHRODESIS

R21                                                                                                   04/01/2017 – 3/28/2019                                 $415,875

Principle Investigator: Andrew Anderson, PhD

Co-Investigators: Alexej Barg, MD; Charles Saltzman, MD

The results of this research will yield an improved understanding of how ankle fusion and total ankle replacement change the motions of the primary ankle and adjacent joints. Results will also provide fundamental insight into the biomechanics of normal ankles.