Sihem Boudina, PhD

Research Interests

  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Antioxidants
  • Mesenchymal Stem Cells
  • Adipose Tissue
  • Ischemic Preconditioning
  • Aging
  • Mitochondria, Heart
  • Mitochondria, Muscle

Languages

  • English

Academic Information

  • Departments: Biochemistry - Adjunct Associate Professor, Internal Medicine - Adjunct Associate Professor, Nutrition and Integrative Physiology - Associate Professor, Surgery - Adjunct Assistant Professor
  • Divisions: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Endocrinology and Metabolism

Academic Office Information

  • George and Dolores Eccles Institute of Human Genetics
    15 N 2030 E, Room: 3145
    Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Research Statement

The Boudina Laboratory we are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in weight gain regulation and adipose tissue expansion in diet-induced obesity (DIO). Our laboratory is focused on (1) the understanding of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in fat development in DIO in mice, and (2) to study the effect of dietary on white adipose progenitor cells proliferation and differentiation.

Academic Bio

Sihem Boudina received her bachelor’s degree in Animal Physiology from the University of Science and Technology in Algiers then went to the University of Bordeaux 2 where she did her doctoral studies in Biological and Medical Sciences under the mentorship of Dr. Pierre Dos Santos. She then joined Dr. Dale Abel’s group for a post-doctoral position in 2002. Dr. Boudina was then recruited to the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes as a tenure track Assistant Professor in 2010. She is also the interim director for the Metabolic Phenotyping Core facility at the University of Utah.

Dr. Boudina has had a distinguished career in Diabetes and Cardiovascular related research. As a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dale Abel, she elucidated the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in altering cardiac metabolism, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic heart. Dr. Boudina also established a new assay to measure mitochondrial respiration using an oxygen sensor probe. Furthermore, she was among the first investigators to show that mitochondrial uncoupling played a crucial role in altered cardiac efficiency in obese animals. Her work was published in the journals Diabetes and Circulation.

Her research interest is focused on the role of oxidative stress in the development of obesity and the related cardiovascular complications. Dr. Boudina is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Boudina has obtained several awards and scholarships such as two post-doctoral fellowships from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and the American Heart Association as well as a scientist development grant from the American Heart Assiciation.

Dr. Boudina is committed to mentoring the next generation of researchers. In the past four years she has supervised post-doctoral research fellows, undergraduates and medical students in her laboratory. She has mentored summer students sponsored by the American Heart Association. She also participated as a mentor in the Native American Summer Research Programs sponsored by the University of Utah, Department of Pediatrics and the Bioscience Undergraduate Research Program.

Education History

Type School Degree
Doctoral Training Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2
Biological and Medical Sciences
Ph.D.
Graduate Training Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2
Neuroscience and Neuropharmacology
M.Sc.
Undergraduate University of Science and Technology, Algeria
Animal Physiology and Biochemistry
B.Sc.

Global Impact

Education History

Type School Degree Country
Doctoral Training Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2
Biological and Medical Sciences
Ph.D. France
Graduate Training Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2
Neuroscience and Neuropharmacology
M.Sc. France
Undergraduate University of Science and Technology, Algeria
Animal Physiology and Biochemistry
B.Sc. Algeria