Division of Microbiology and Immunology

The Division of Microbiology and Immunology (M&I) in the University of Utah School of Medicine Department of Pathology was established in the early 1970s by past chairman Ernst Eichwald, MD. Dr. Eichwald, an internationally recognized clinician/scientist who recruited a group of faculty to Utah with shared interests in better understanding the immunological mechanisms underlying graft infection and transplantation tolerance. Shortly after its creation, the division was granted graduate degree-granting status from the state of Utah, and continues today to provide high quality education and research experiences to qualified students seeking a PhD or master’s degree in microbiology and immunology. The Division of M&I is under the direction of the Division Head Brian Evavold, PhD. 

Research Showcase

Ryan O'Connell Awarded Highly Competitive Grant
Research
Sep 01, 2017

Ryan O'Connell Awarded Highly Competitive Grant

Ryan O’Connell has received a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) Scholar Award, which is a highly competitive 5-year grant given to mid-career faculty who are making ground breaking discoveries in the field of leukemia and lymphoma research. ... Read More

Pathology
Finding the Perfect Match: A new approach to battle drug-resistant bacteria
Research
Jun 20, 2017

Finding the Perfect Match: A new approach to battle drug-resistant bacteria

Antibiotics were the wonder drug of the 20th century, but persistent use and over-prescription have opened the door that has allowed bacteria to evolve resistance. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than two million people in the United States develop bacterial infections that are resistant to multiple antibiotics every year.... Read More

Pathology
Key “Missing Link” in Early Mammalian Development Found
Research
May 30, 2017

Key “Missing Link” in Early Mammalian Development Found

The studies have broad implications for understanding how different lineages of a developing embryo are specified, and thus are relevant to the field of regenerative medicine, in which using this information specific cell types and organ systems could be better engineered. The work involved investigators in the University of Utah Department of Pathology and Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health.... Read More

Pathology

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