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Study Summary: Can Telephone Interviews Accurately Measure the Daily Function of Aging Patients?

May 31, 2022

In the early 2000s, a short telephone interview was developed for the assessment of cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease who are unwilling or unable to be examined in person. This interview can distinguish between normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia; however, no studies have examined if the modified telephone interview (mTICS) can predict daily functioning. Predicting daily functioning is likely important because, after a diagnosis is rendered, it is that daily function that is most important to patients and their caregivers.

Study Summary: Can Telephone Interviews Accurately Measure the Daily Function of Aging Patients?

In the early 2000s, a short telephone interview was developed for the assessment of cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease who are unwilling or unable to be examined in person. This interview can distinguish between normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia; however, no studies have examined if the modified telephone interview (mTICS) can predict daily functioning. Predicting daily functioning is likely important because, after a diagnosis is rendered, it is that daily function that is most important to patients and their caregivers.

In response to this gap in research, faculty members Dustin Hammers, MD, and Kevin Duff, MD, recently contributed to a study concluding that the modified telephone interview appears to be able to predict the daily functioning levels of older individuals with MCI. These results have proven to be valuable for geriatricians and other providers who manage this at-risk group, especially during COVID-19 where in-person visits are often impossible.

To read the full study, click the button below.